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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  December 8, 2015 3:12am-4:01am PST

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so we need to find ways to be able to pierce that. >> reporter: scott, a recent congressional report warned that americans are being radicalized by violent extremists at a rate that is straining law enforcement's ability to stop suspects before it's too late. >> jeff pegues in our washington newsroom. jeff, thanks. in a related story, there was a rare victory today for supporters of tougher gun laws. the united states supreme court let stand a local law in illinois that bans semiautomatic weapons and large- capacity magazines. jan crawford is following this. >> reporter: the justices gave no reason for why they turned down the challenge to the ban on assault weapons in an illinois town.
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but in dissent, justin clarence thomas, joined by justice antonin scalia, said lower-court rulings upholding the bans were relegating the second amendment to a second class right. the supreme court in 2008 struck down a handgun ban in the district of columbia, ruling that the second amendment protects a person's right to bear arms for self-defense in the home. but in the years since, lower federal courts have narrowly applied the landmark decision, allowing what they consider reasonable gun restrictions, bans on large-capacity semiautomatic firearms, like the commonly owned ar-15. seven states and d.c. have laws banning possession of those weapons. the city of highland park passed its ban in 2013. mayor nancy rotering said it was due in part to the shooting at sandy hook elementary school. >> it's well past time to take action to reduce the gun violence that threatens our community's safety, our nation's safety and inflicts fear and pain on countless families and communities.
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>> reporter: but gun rights supporters say the bans cover guns lawfully used by millions of americans for self-defense and for sport. [ gunfire ] today's order is unlikely to encourage sweeping change. 39 states where such guns are legal have laws blocking cities from passing local restrictions. now, there typically has to be a conflict in the lower courts before the justices will step in, and so far, scott, all those lower courts are in agreement to uphold these bans. >> jan crawford at the supreme court. jan, thank you. there's new video of another police shooting in chicago, but this time no charges. this time no charges. and a former president teaches enough pressure in here for ya? ugh. my sinuses are killing me. yeah...just wait 'til we hit ten thousand feet. i'm gonna take mucinex sinus-max. too late, we're about to take off. these dissolve fast. they're new liquid gels. and you're coming with me...
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the justice department is investigating chicago police use of force against minorities. this on the same day that prosecutors cleared a chicago cop who fatally shot a black man in the back. here's dean reynolds. >> male black running southbound on king, sweatshirt, black pants. >> reporter: in a show of transparency unusual for chicago, prosecutors released new dash cam video to show why they did not file charges against the officers involved in the fatal shooting. it showed a 25-year-old suspect fleeing police after a struggle carrying what they said was a handgun.
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that video's release came days after tape of the more notorious shooting of 17-year-old laquan mcdonald galvanized the city in protest and hours after the justice department announced its enquiry, something mayor rahm emanuel welcomes. >> its in our self-interest as a city for them to be here. we not only accept it, we need it. >> reporter: critics like andy shaw of the better government association, say reform is long overdue. >> we've spent $500 million handling excessive force cases over the past decade. the justice department could have come here 25 years ago. >> reporter: john escalante is the interim police superintendent. is the culture of the chicago police department problematic? >> i don't think so. one thing we're looking at right rs slipping through the cracks. >> reporter: he need look no further than a series of action reports from officers on the scene the night mcdonald was killed. all of them supported the shooter, officer jason van dyke,
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and all were at odds with the video from their own cruisers. they all claim mcdonald was a homicidal threat that night, swinging his knife with a three- inch blade in an aggressive, exaggerated manner that put van dyke's life in danger. officer van dyke is already the subject of a long-running federal investigation, scott, which is also looking into allegations of a cover-up by other officers on the scene that night. >> dean reynolds in chicago. thanks, dean. and we'll be right back.
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in sunday school jimmy carter teaches the good news of the gospel, but this past sunday
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he had some good news of his own. he's now free of cancer. here's michelle miller. >> reporter: the crowd gathers in front of maranatha baptist church at dawn, five hours before the lessons begin. >> we thank you so much for coming. >> reporter: to see the man teaching sunday school. >> good morning. >> all right. i see you're wide awake. [ laughter ] >> reporter: in plains, georgia, president jimmy carter has taught in his hometown church for nearly 35 years. jan williams has worked with him the whole time. >> mr. jimmy is one of the kindest southern gentlemen who speaks what he thinks, stands up for what he believes in, never been ashamed to say he was a christian. >> love without getting credit for being a loving person, even loving your enemies. >> reporter: he seems rejuvenated by this crowd of people. would you say that?
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would you agree with me? >> i don't think once you're a politician you ever get over being a politician. he loves the crowds. >> reporter: those crowds have multiplied since the 91-year-old former president announced his cancer diagnosis in august. julie marshall came from north carolina. >> to the carters, it's just another sunday, but to those of us who are here, this is day we'll never forget. >> reporter: even through his cancer treatments he never missed a sunday, and it was in this church that he broke the news. >> when i went this week they didn't find any cancer at all. [ applause ] >> whoa. good job. >> he's going to be here for -- he's going to be here for a long time to come, i hope. >> reporter: giving lessons from the good book to anyone who will listen. >> well, i hope you'll all come back some day. >> reporter: michelle miller, cbs news, plains, georgia. >> another president honored america's best at a star-studded
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gala. that story is next. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,
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finally tonight, president obama helped pay tribute to some of the most talented people in america. >> rita moreno, seiji ozawa, cicely tyson, carole king, george lucas, each of these artists was born with something special to offer the country and the world. >> and each was celebrated last night at the annual kennedy center honors. actress gina rodriguez paid tribute to oscar, tony, emmy and grammy winner rita moreno. >> you're my icon, my living legend, and what matters most, my friend. rita, this is my love letter to you. >> steven spielberg gave rave reviews to fellow filmmaker george lucas. >> he's a path finder and a pioneer. george lucas' "star wars" changed movies absolutely forever. ♪ >> but the highlight of the
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night came when aretha franklin sang the praises and music of carole king. ♪ you make me feel like a natural woman ♪ >> and you can see the kennedy center honors broadcast tuesday night, december 29th, right here on cbs. and that's the "cbs overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and "cbs morning." from the broadcast septemberer in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." the chicago police department is now under the microscope. attorney general loretta lynch announced the justice department is launching a wide ranging civil rights investigation into the chicago pd. the probe will go beyond the shooting death of a young black man shot 16 times by a white officer who now faces murder charges. meanwhile, a video of a second police shooting has been released. this time the officer will not be charged. dean reynolds reports. >> male black running south bound on king, sweatshirt, black pants. >> reporter: in a show of
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transparent si unusual for chicago, prosecutors released new dash cam video to show why they did not file charges against the officers involved in the fatal shooting. it showed a 25-year-old suspect fleeing police after a struggle carrying what they said was a handgun. that video's release came days after tape of the more notorious shooting of 17-year-old laquan mcdonald galvanized the city in protest and hours after the justice department announced its enquiry, something mayor rahm emanuel welcomes. >> its in our self-interest as a city for them to be here. we not only accept it, we need it. >> reporter: critics like andy shaw of the better government association, say reform is long overdue. >> we've spent $500 million handling excessive force cases over the past decade. the justice department could have come here 25 years ago. >> reporter: john escalante is the interim police superintendent. is the culture of the chicago police department problematic? >> i don't think so. one thing we're looking at right now is why are some officers slipping through the cracks. >> reporter: he need look no
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further than a series of action reports from officers on the scene the night mcdonald was killed. all of them supported the shooter, officer jason van dyke, and all were at odds with the video from their own cruisers. they all claim mcdonald was a homicidal threat that night, swinging his knife with a three- inch blade in an aggressive, exaggerated manner that put van dyke's life in danger. officer van dyke is already the subject of a long-running federal investigation, scott, which is also looking into allegations of a cover-up by other officers on the scene that night. an army of investigators continues to unearth new details about the husband and wife killers behind the massacre in san bernardino. carter evans has the latest. >> reporter: two days before syed rizwan farook and his wife tashfeen malik killed 14 people in san bernardino, farook signed in here at the riverside magnum range for target practice with his ar-15.
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mike mcgee said farook approached him. was there anything about him that stuck out? >> not even close. >> reporter: he did ask you a question, though. his gun was smoking. what does that tell you about his experience with guns? >> well, the experience with the rifle tells me it was a new rifle. he was not familiar with it. >> reporter: when you saw his picture, did you recognize him? >> i did recognize him as somebody who had been here in the past. >> reporter: firearms instructor john gallette said farook had been to the range at least twice. >> it's devastating to people, to know that this is where he might have prepared for those last days. >> reporter: federal investigators say the assault rifles used in the attack were purchased by enrique marquez. he lived next door to farook during his high school years. neighbors say the pair were good friends. agents raided the marquez home twice over the last few days. they used a battering ram and cut through the garage door with a blow torch to search for evidence. marquez checked into a mental health facility hours after the shooting.
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he has not been arrested and today is talking to investigators. so far federal agents have conducted more than 400 interviews, and they're still trying to determine a motive. john bowdich is with the fbi. >> we have learned and believe that both subjects were radicalized and had been very active quite some time. now, how did that happen? the question we're trying to get at. >> reporter: investigators know farook met his wife in saudi arabia where she moved from pakistan. she was educated as a pharmacist. chaz harrison was one of farook's coworkers. >> i asked him about his wife. he was very secretive about his wife. he didn't want to reveal much about his wife. >> reporter: he says farook talked about wanting to leave the country for good. >> he didn't want to be in the united states because he said his taxes was helping support the war on islam, the war on muslims. >> reporter: farook's father, who is still in the san bernardino area, told cbs news his son was deeply religious.
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president obama's national address on terrorism is getting a lukewarm reception on capitol hill. republican congressional leaders say the president's call for expanded back ground checks for gun purchases is going nowhere. and they say there's no need for a congressional authorization to strike the islamic state in iraq and syria. the president also stressed the need for americans not to turn on one another or to begin a profiling campaign against muslim americans here in the united states. >> we will destroy isil and any other organization that tries to harm us. our success won't depend on tough talk or abandoning our values or giving in to fear. that's what groups like isil are hoping for. we cannot turn against one another by let thing fight be defined as a war between america and islam. that too is what groups like isil want. isil does not speak for islam.
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they are thugs and killers, part of a cult of death. >> chief white house correspondent major garrett has more. >> reporter: the reviews are in, they're lukewarm to be charitable. the white house was bracing for precisely that. so why did the white house give an oval office address that had no new news or new ideas or military strategies against isis? the genesis of this speech started saturday here at the white house after the president met with his national security team. it was the consensus that this administration was losing control, losing grip on the entire national conversation about isis, and the president needed to get involved in that conversation to try to accomplish three things. first, to convey to the nation that the campaign against isis is more muscular and more aggressive. there are more u.s. bombing runs. the british are now bombing in syria. there are troop commitments from germany and much greater intelligence sharing with the french. the president also wanted to address the gun control argument. even though the political climate on capitol hill with
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republicans in control of the house and senate remains hostile, the president believes the fact pattern in san bernardino strengthens his gun control argument and he wanted to make that case. thirdly and possibly most important when you talk to people here at the white house, the president believes the country could turn on itself, and this message of tolerance for muslim-americans is not just about that, pure tolerance, but a counterterrorism strategy. the president believes it is crucial that this country maintain good, solid working relationships with the muslim community in this country. not just as a matter of tolerance, but as a matter of counterterrorism success being able to detect, infiltrate and stop terrorist attacks before they start. there was a good deal of conversation whether this president should give this address today or tonight. but the president wanted the largest primetime audience he could find, sunday was it. he knows the reviews are tepid. but this president has long relied on speeches and ignored
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the matchups are set for this year's college football playoff. the game also be played on new year's eve. clemson is ranked number one. the tigers will play the fourth ranked oklahoma sooners in the orange bowl. second ranked alabama will take the field against number three michigan state in the cotton bowl. the winners will square off in the national championship game in arizona. meanwhile, the university of houston is still investigating how a postgame victory celebration turned into an on-field brawl. fans rushed the field on saturday after the cougars beat temple, locking up a bowl bid. cameras captured security guards hired by the school beating some of the fans. manuel bojorquez has more.
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>> reporter: it's developed into an unspoken tradition. your team wins a big game and you storm the field in celebration. but here in houston over the wmd, that celebration turned violent and could lead to criminal charges for some security guards who got physical with fans. when the game between the university of houston and temple ended, the wrestling match between some security guards and fans began. cameras captured the chaos as fans rushed the field after the cougars' championship win. one fan appears to be punched by a security guard. another is tackled and slammed into the ground. cse is the private security contractor hired by the university of houston. houston's vice president of athletics expressed his anger and disappointment with the cse employees, in part saying --
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>> we'll present any evidence, such as video, witness statements, and we also lock at the applicable law and we present that to the district attorney for charges. and the security officers were also given instructions before the game by cse staff that the students rush the field, to allow them to rush the field. no instructions were given to punch or tackle anyone. >> reporter: rushing the field is a time-honored tradition in college sports but can be dangerous. in 1993, 80 people were injured when fans rushed the field following the game between wisconsin and michigan. and four years ago, a dozen people were hurt after thousands swarmed the field after oklahoma state beat rival oklahoma. the security company has issued a statement saying it's launching its own investigation adding "any actions by cse
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personnel that contradict our training, cse's other requirements or the law are not condoned by cse and will not be tolerated." president obama was a late arrival at the kennedy center honors sunday night, after addressing the nation on terrorism, he donned a tux and celebrated five honorees for their lifetime contributions to american culture. charlie rose has the story. [ applause ] >> reporter: less than two weeks before the release of the new "star wars" movie, george lucas was praised by hollywood heavyweight steve spielberg and martin scosezi. >> "star wars" changed movies forever. >> reporter: for the second year in a row, steven colbert hosted the event. >> good evening, ladies and
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gentlemen, elected representatives, diplomats, dignitaries and the small hand full of you not running for president right now. >> reporter: traditionally, the honorees sit with the president and first lady, but president obama's seat remained etchty for the first part of the event. he arrived less than half an hour after his oval office address. >> the owner of a green and white helicopter, you left your lights on. >> reporter: singer rita moreno was 4r5lauded for breaking grou for latinos. >> for so long in my life, being puerto rican felt like i was being left out. you made it an honor. >> reporter: the 83-year-old first dazzled fans on the screen before going on to win all four of the biggest prizes in show
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business over her career, the oscar, the tony, two emmys and a grammy. another honoree, the talented conductor who led the boston symphony for 29 seasons. ♪ this is my story >> reporter: her long career paved the way for african-americans in the industry. >> you turned down more roles than you can imagine because they didn't lift or serve us as a people. for six decades, she's been diligent in her pursuit to better us all. >> reporter: at age 90, she's starring on broadway alongside james earl jones. and carol king was inducted into the songwriters hall of fame nearly 30 years ago for her influence on music. she has written more than 100 hit singles. ♪ you make me feel like a
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natural woman ♪ aretha franklin brought the house down in the song she immortalized. king was visibly moved by the power house and brought tears to the eyes of the president. man (sternly): where do you think you're going? mr. mucus: to work, with you. it's taco tuesday. man: you're not coming. i took mucinex to help get rid of my mucusy congestion. i'm good all day. [announcer:] mucinex keeps working. not 4, not 6, but 12 hours. let's end this
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the kennedy center sunday night. she's only 1 of 12 performers who earn an emmy, a grammy, oscar, and a tony. the grand slam of show business. michelle miller has her story. ♪ >> reporter: to fully appreciate the barrier breaking career of rita moreno, you only need to spend a few minutes with her in the bronx neighborhood she first called home. >> i need to get out of here. oh, my goodness, what an honor. >> reporter: here, the puerto rican transplant turned hollywood star let -- >> it's so beautiful. >> reporter: did you live around here? >> yes. i lived around the block. ♪ >> reporter: she moved here at the age of 5, traveling from puerto rico to new york, on a ship with her newly divorced mother.
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though revered now, her earliest memories weren't so positive. her journey not so welcoming. >> i ran into racist stuff quickly. even when i didn't understand what the word "spick" meant, but i could see the hatred in their faces. and i grew up feeling inferior to just about everybody in the world. >> reporter: dance lessons provided an escape when she was just 6. a natural performer, she was entertaining in light clnightcl the age of 9. >> i wanted to be a movie star first of all. >> reporter: she styled herself to look like the actress,
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because her dark hair resembled her own. >> she was the only role model i had. there were none. there was nobody in the movies who resembled me in any way. >> reporter: after a talent agent spotted her, she landed a contract with mgm studios and moved to hollywood. but it didn't take long before she found herself being typecast. >> i played american indians, polynesians. every one of them without exception were usually characters with no education, who could barely speak english, with thick accents. it was humiliating, and it was hurtful. >> reporter: was it a compromise the >> of course it was. absolutely. but i always felt that somehow,
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some day, someone would see me and say, that girl has talent, and i'm going to do something for her. >> reporter: her some day came at the age of 26 when she was tapped to play anita in "west side story." ♪ >> i finally found a role model. >> why would you want to go to puerto rico? >> the first time i had ever played a young hispanic woman who had a sense of dignity, who had a sense of self-respect. >> reporter: she won an oscar for that performance. visiting the play ground where many of the movie scenes were shot. she remembered the significance of her win. what did that night mean? >> oh, it was hard to find words for it, because as anybody who wins an oscar will tell you, it
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takes almost a month or so to really believe it. my winning the oscar had a huge effect on the hispanic community. >> reporter: ironically, winning an oscar did not widen the role to great film roles, so she shifted her role to the stage, and the small screen. ♪ they call me broadway bob >> reporter: she won a grammy for her singing on the television show "the electric company." earned two emmys for appearances on "the muppet show" and "the rockford files." >> boy, you had me scared. ♪ >> reporter: and she won a tony for her performance in the broadway production of "the ritz," a role she reprized in the film version. >> i'm a person who persevered. you fall down and you get up,
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dust yourself off and keep moving in that direction. >> reporter: now 83, with more than 40 films and just as many television shows under her belt, she's not only getting respect, she's in demand. she recently guest starred in the award winning tv show "jane the virgin." >> i am now the pioneer, which i think is kind of charming. >> reporter: it's been near live eight decades since that 5-year-old girl lived in an overcrowded building on this block. and in that time, rita moreno has become the role model she never had. >> and what's important about that kind of honor and recognition is that it's for a lifetime of work. i just feel so fortunate and
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privileged, and more than ever, i feel very
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an emotional return to paris three weeking after their shows were canceled. the concerts are paying tribute to the victims of the massacre. elizabeth palmer is in london with the defiant message from the band. >> reporter: right after the paris attacks, the police shut down all large public gatherings, and two u-2 concerts were canceled. but last night, the band was back on stage in top form. ♪ >> reporter: and 17,000 fans roared back their welcome. it's just over three weeks since u2 canceled two concerts, scheduled to go ahead in paris
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right after terrorists killed 130 people. 90 of them were music fans of the bataclan concert hall listening to the band eagles of death metal. bono and the members of u2 paid tribute to the victims at a memorial nearby and vowed their own concerts would be rescheduled as soon as it was safe. it was, they told cnn ahead of last night's performance, a statement of resistance. >> paris is a very romantic city, and, you know, the essence of romance is defiance. and defiant joy we think is the mark of our band and of rock 'n' roll. they're a death cult, we're a life cult. >> reporter: there were rumors eagles of death metal would join u2 on stage. but instead, fans saw another special guest. patty smith, who closed the show
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with one of the greatest of all rock 'n' roll anthems of defiance. ♪ ♪ people have the power, people have the power ♪ >> reporter: and bono's apparently written a brand new song about the paris attacks, and fans are certainly hoping they're going to hear him when he's back on stage there. >> and that's the "cbs overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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. it's tuesday, december 8th, this is the "cbs news." shuning trump t.gop front runner faces a backlash in his party after seaing he wants to ban all muslims from entering the united states. opponents line up to denounce him. tied to terror. the fbi releases few details on the san bernardino shoot, saying the couple had been radicalized

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